Glen Feshie, 14 October 2018

We decided to take a less trodden approach to Sgor Gaoith, via Creag Follais, Clach Choutsaich
and Sgoran Dubh Beag and Mor. Easy walking, with forest tracks and paths lower down and
surprisingly dry ground on the hill after the amount of rain over the previous few days, made for a
very sociable and chatty outing.

We numbered 10 people and 3 dogs, with “weel kent” faces and a couple of newer ones: Anne,
for whom this was her second outing with us and Laura, for whom this was her first. Richard and
dog confined themselves to forest tracks, the former still nursing a knee injury after falling into a
badger sett whilst walking and reading a book at the same time. There is a lesson there.

There was a fair bit of travel talk. Anne was heading off to Nepal for the first time and Rob had
been there earlier this year, so there was a good exchange of helpful information. Wendell had
been in the Canadian Rockies in the summer, so it was good to hear about his adventures there.
Sollifluction, Saharan solar power as a source of global energy and the ethics of vegans eating
mushrooms were other overheard conversations.

Sgor Gaoith finds itself in much reduced circumstances. Prior to the 1981 revision of Munros
Tables, four of its six summits were Munros. Now only Sgor Gaoith itself has Munro status. We
descended over Geal Charn, one of the demoted Munros, and picked up a rough stalkers path
which neatly channelled us between the converging burns of Allt nan Cuileach and Allt a
Mharcaidh. That is when we discovered where all the water of the previous few days rainfall had
gone – into the burns. After casting about for a while we found an easy crossing point and
finished off with a bit of a route march back to the cars so Laura could get back to start work in
Inverness.

The day was rounded off by relaxing at the Loch Insh Watersports centre watching the sunset
over the loch. We covered 21km in distance and 1050m of ascent. Photos by Michael Garrett.

Participants: Michael, Nell,  Arthur, Laura, Ann, Miha, Richard, Robin, Rob and Wendell.

Kinloch Rannoch meet, 28 September 2018

The squally autumnal weather did not deter the thirteen club members on the Kinloch Rannoch meet. A healthy number of Munros, Corbetts, Grahams and a Marilyn or two were climbed over the weekend. A fairly determined fight against the elements saw Masoud’s barbeque deliver delicious Iranian spiced chicken for dinner. Evidence of Maskelyne’s 18th Century pendulum deflection experiment on Schiehallion was sought and a rather fine example of a cup marked slab from an earlier period visited. The cyclists amongst us avoided the long walks in to remote Corbetts; one less scrupulous member being aided by Hosea Libby’s inventiveness.  Tea and cakes were taken.
Friday afternoon saw the most of party arrive at Kinloch Rannoch Outdoor Centre at the same time from different directions, taking advantage of decent weather to take in a hill or two en route to the meet. Dougie, it has to be said, had an extended journey having started at the head of Glen Lyon and worked his way through the hills between there and Kinloch Rannoch over the preceding week.
Because stalking was in full swing, the Lawers munros and Tarmachan saw several parties on Friday and Saturday, leaving the Glen Lyon munros until Sunday, when no stalking was planned. The three Corbetts to the North of Loch Rannoch saw visits from several parties over the weekend and though stalking was taking place no problems were encountered (although Dougie had a longer walk than expected to Beinn Mholach following the advice of friendly stalkers).
Ewen, Masoud, Marion and Peter sought out the sites of Maskelyne’s Pendulum Deflection experiment to calculate the mass of the earth by measuring the gravitational pull  of a mountain on a pendulum. Schiehallion was chosen because of its isolation from other mountains and symmetrical shape. Two observatories and a bothy were built to conduct the experiment which calculated the mass of the earth to within 20% of what it is believed to be today.  
More significantly for hillwalkers and mountaineers, it was during this experiment that the idea of contour lines to link up points of the same height was hit upon. Where would we be without that idea?
Meet participants: Michael, Kevin, Nell, Steve, Peter, Marion, Dougie, Cerian, Masoud, Ewen, Albert, Lizzie and Arthur.