Maol Chean-dearg, 10 November 2019

An encouraging weather forecast did not disappoint.  The conditions in Glencarron were excellent, and we decided to ascend Maol Chean-dearg from Coulags.  There had been a hard frost, and the ground was well frozen – handy for negotiating boggy country.  The first part of the walk up the glen was by the track to the new hydro dam.  There are few suitable glens these days without a run-of-the-river scheme; much less intrusive than the windfarms.

An Ruadh-Stac

Past the stone where legendary hero Fionn tethered his dog when he went off to fight the baddies, then take the track to the left towards the col.  We cast a few longing glances up at An Ruadh-Stac; padding up the slabs is great on a summer’s day, but route-finding on the way down can be awkward – and slippery in these conditions!  We left it for another day.

At the col, we left the path leading over to Torridon and struck off right up the hill path;  well-defined in most places, but crossing a few boulder fields.  The weather had been calm up until this point; we started to feel the wind chill heading onto the higher slopes.  By the top the visibility was superb, but we were glad of the shelter of the elaborate cairn.  Great views north to Torridon, west to the Applecross hills, south to Ben Nevis, east to the Monar hills…..

A well-deserved summit break

After a lengthy photographic stop at the summit we reluctantly headed back down the same way, stopping off at the bothy for some food and drink and getting back to the car at dusk, around 4.30; late enough for this time of year.  But we cheered ourselves with the thought that the sun will be coming back towards us in around six weeks’ time!

The day was rounded off by a visit to the Ledgowan Hotel in Achnasheen and their ever-welcoming hosts, blazing fire and comfortable armchairs.  The team this time was Daniel, Masoud, Michael, Dougie and Ewen.

Kinlochleven, 25-26 October 2019

The view from my window of snow on Ben Wyvis on Friday morning had me excitedly scrabbling around to find my ice axe as I packed for the Kinlochleven meet. Alas, it was a false promise of early season soft, unconsolidated snow, but hopefully an early portent of good things to come.

Kinlochleven, since the closure of the Alcan plant twenty years ago, has been transforming itself from a factory town into a tourist destination and centre for mountain pursuits. The town is surrounded on three sides by mountains with networks of walking and biking trails, it is an important staging point on the West Highland Way and hosts the Ice Factor which contains the world’s biggest indoor ice climbing wall. In the last few years the surrounding mountains have been the venue for the series of extreme Scottish Skyline races – the Mamores Vertical Kilometre, the Ben Nevis Ultra, The Ring of Steall Skyline and the Glen Coe Skyline – all of which start or finish, or start and finish, at Kinlochleven.

Ascending Glas Bheinn, Buachaille Etive Mor in the background

The assiduous reader will have noted that little has been said, so far, of the towering peaks ascended or the feats of derring do undertaken by your correspondent and his companions, however, the photo at the top of this report demonstrates otherwise; it shows Garbh Beinn, Kinlochleven and Beinn na Caillich, with Mam na Gualainn behind.
Saturday saw two parties ascend, in squally weather, a quite unprepossessing Corbett – Glas Bheinn – which lies between Loch Eilde Mor and the Blackwater Reservoir. Despite the modest size of the hill itself, its position – with the Mamores to the North, Glencoe to the South and Ben Alder to the east – gave superb mountain views. One party descended below the dam of the Reservoir to visit the small graveyard for men who were killed in the construction of the Reservoir.  Some of them perished in winter weather walking back to camp from the Kingshouse, others in the construction of the dam which is nearly one kilometre long and was the last major dam built without mechanised help, with 3000 navvies employed in its construction.

Proof of snow, Glas Bheinn

Your correspondent also summitted Garbh Bheinn to the South of Loch Leven in fairly windy conditions on Friday and, on Sunday with Robin, traversed Beinn na Caillich and Mam na Gualainn, on the north side of Loch Leven.   Dougie and Michael were thwarted in their ascent of Fraochaidh from Glen Duror by a missing bridge over the River Duror, and by forestry plantations. Other lesser hills were ascended en route home.
Participants: Arthur, Steve, Michael, Dougie, Kirsty R., Jim, Ewen, Ian (guest), Peter, Marion, Robin.