Burns Supper, 18 January 2020

We had a good weekend at Elphin with better weather than forecast both days, though quite wild on the tops on Saturday.  Dougie, Shona, Brian, Masoud and guest Terry get the prize for effort; they had a cracking day on Quinag – panorama above – despite Shona leaving a piping hot flask of coffee and her lunch in the hut, and Terry thinking he’d lost his van keys on the hill only to find them in the van door!

Quinag looking south to Canisp and Suilven

Marion, Peter,  Louise and Jim were one of two low-level parties starting from Lochinver who followed a WalkHighlands route up the River Inver and over the hill to Glencanisp Lodge and back by the road.  Ewen, Anne, Fay and Catherine, having decided against an original plan for a through route from Little Assynt to Lochinver via Suileag bothy because of concerns about burn crossings, did more or less the same route in the reverse direction.  Both parties arrived back at the same time, and joined forces for coffee in the Pie Shop.  

Robin addressing the haggis

In the evening an enjoyable Burns supper emerged from the apparent chaos of the preparations, with everyone contributing to the feast by making something, peeling neeps and tatties or washing up.  As much as anyone could eat and more, all for £5 a head!

 On Sunday a reduced party of mountaineers,  Brian, Dougie and Shona, had a boggy walk into Canisp, were nearly blown off their feet on several occasions but were rewarded with stunning views of Suliven and the surrounding area.  Andrew, Louise and Fay walked from Blughasary road end along the Achiltibuie postman’s path to Dun Canna, with Marion and Peter opting for the fishing track along the river and up to two hill lochans.  Cloudy at first but bright later. 

On Canisp

Ewen and Jim ascended the mighty Beinn Eilideach, a Marilyn behind Ullapool Hill, starting from the radio mast at Braes.  Superb views of An Teallach, the Beinn Dearg group and the Summer Isles; maximum result for minimum effort, as they were on the hill for under three hours.  A chat with some locals they encountered on the hill explained the well defined path up the rather obscure hill, which was made by an Ullapool resident and his dog who ran up there most days!    A visit to the Frigate on Ullapool seafront resulted in a sociable meeting with the aforementioned low level walkers.

An Teallach from Beinn Eilideach